Students

Peggy Hogan

MA (Musicology, Gender and Feminist Studies)
Hip Hop Archive Project

Peggy Hogan

MA (Musicology, Gender and Feminist Studies)
Hip Hop Archive Project

Peggy Hogan is a master’s student in musicology and gender and feminist studies at McGill University. Her research focuses on cultural exchange in popular music, and specifically, her thesis project looks at Asian-Afro transnationalism in the work of women in hip hop. She is a rapper herself, under the moniker Hua Li, and works as a music educator and as A&R manager for Art Not Love Records.

Sijia Li

BA (English, Cultural Studies)
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2016-17

Sijia Li

BA (English, Cultural Studies)
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2016-17

Sijia was born in Beijing and grew up in Montreal. In her second year majoring in English (Cultural Studies), she is engaged in many activities in the McGill Department of English, including being a stage manger this year for the Directors Projects. Her area of interest includes writing, performance, and storytelling in the digital age.

Viola Chen

BA (East Asian Studies, Indigenous Studies, Cultural Studies)
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2016-17

Viola Chen

BA (East Asian Studies, Indigenous Studies, Cultural Studies)
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2016-17

Viola Chen (陈宜晴) is a student and an artist currently finishing her undergraduate degree in East Asian Studies, Cultural Studies, and Indigenous Studies at McGill. Her research is invested in studying diasporic subjectivities in relation to queer experience and Indigenous sovereignty. She will be working at Eastern Bloc through the Archie Malloch Internship Award, developing programs to bridge the work of marginalized communities to mainstream developments of contemporary technology. A selection of her work can be found at violachen.link.

Daniel Steele

PhD Candidate,
Information Studies 
Malloch Fellow 2016-17

Daniel Steele

PhD Candidate,
Information Studies 
Malloch Fellow 2016-17

Daniel Steele is a PhD candidate at the School of Information Studies with Dr. Guastavino. Mr. Steele’s experience draws together hearing, psychology, and urban design and planning, which has contributed to an extensive array of projects in a field known as soundscape. He serves as the research lead on the Musikiosk project, a soundscape intervention that took place in the Parc du Portugal in the summer of 2015. His doctoral work focuses on understanding the conceptualizations of urban sound by urban planners and designers. His research findings will contribute towards creating and directing resources that are meaningful to planners and designers on sound(scape) and that are also sensitive to the contexts of their workplace and experience. At IPLAI he looks forward to developing resources for the general public so that citizens can feel empowered to improve their soundscapes.

Daniel was trained in psychoacoustics and audio technology at Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he studied both mathematics and music. He also holds a Masters of Architecture in Urban Design from McGill and a member of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research Music Media and Technology (CIRMMT). His research has taken him on extended soundscape research exchanges in the Netherlands, where he engaged with the active European soundscape community. Before returning to academia, he worked as a research programmer at the Starkey Hearing Research Center in Berkeley, California, specializing in hearing loss and music. At Starkey, he became interested in environmental auditory perception in addition to the technological aspects, leading him to soundscapes.

Outside of the laboratory, Mr. Steele is an avid music performer, swimmer, runner, cook, and learner of languages.

Elyse Amend

PhD Candidate,
Communication Studies
Malloch Fellow 2016-17

Elyse Amend

PhD Candidate,
Communication Studies
Malloch Fellow 2016-17

Elyse Amend is a Ph.D. candidate in Communication Studies at McGill University, and is supervised

by Associate Professor Darin Barney. She holds a Master of Arts in Journalism Studies (2011) and a

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (2006) from Concordia University.

Her doctoral research focuses on how knowledge, expertise and power operate through nutrition

guidance in Canada. It investigates this by interrogating the institutional history of the state-mandated

Canada’s Food Guide, with specific focus on the expert sources, scientific evidence base, stakeholders,

and decisions involved in the modern-day versions of the guide. This project also explores how the

food guide operates pedagogically in elementary and high school classrooms. Elyse’s research

investigates how scientific, quantitative, and expert-driven discourses about food and eating have

become dominant in debates about nutrition. Her project seeks to contribute ideas about how nutrition

guidance can be rethought outside of mainstream discourses of food and health, and to explore possible

sites of resistance that address the complexities of nutrition and our relationships to food, in order to

improve current policies and approaches to nutrition communication.

Ayca Koseoglu

PhD Student, Faculty of Engineering, School of Architecture
Fred and Betty Price 2016-17

Ayca Koseoglu

PhD Student, Faculty of Engineering, School of Architecture
Fred and Betty Price 2016-17

Ayca Koseoglu is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Architecture at McGill University. She holds an M.A. degree in the History of Architecture and a B.Arch. degree in Architecture both from Middle East Technical University, Ankara. Her dissertation, entitled “Urban Design and Civil Protest: Transformation of Beyazit and Taksim Squares in Istanbul,” explores how these squares were physically transformed in response to civil protests and in relation to each other’s historic and urban role.

She is particularly interested in the agency of architectural/urban space in manifesting socio-political claims.

Jonathan Rouleau

PhD Candidate, Communication Studies
Laboratory of Urban Culture (LUC) Research Fellow 2016-17

Jonathan Rouleau

PhD Candidate, Communication Studies
Laboratory of Urban Culture (LUC) Research Fellow 2016-17

Jonathan is a PhD candidate in communication studies in the Department of Art History & Communication Studies at McGill University. He is completing a dissertation entitled, “The Cultural Roles of Universities in Montreal: Reframing the University-City Approach”. His work examines the ways in which the 4 universities in Montreal and the student population structure, shape and represent the cultural scenes in the city. His research interests include urban culture, popular music and tourism, nighttime cultural economies and cultural policies.

As LUC Fellow, Jonathan will be developing relationships with community partners and other stakeholders through the Salon for collaboration on projects, acting and ambassador for IPLAI, and conducting research on community engagement, demography, and best practices for community-facing work.

Vanessa Blais-Tremblay

PhD Candidate, Schulich School of Music
Jazzing Little Burgundy Fellow 2016-17

Vanessa Blais-Tremblay

PhD Candidate, Schulich School of Music
Jazzing Little Burgundy Fellow 2016-17

Vanessa Blais-Tremblay is a professional violinist and a PhD candidate in Musicology and Women’s Studies at McGill University. Her research focuses on issues of identity in Canadian music of the past century. Specifically, her dissertation project maps the interaction between jazz, gender and identity during the golden age of jazz in Montreal (1925-1955). More jazz was made in Montreal during the first half of the twentieth century than anywhere else in Canada, yet the role that it played in Quebec’s social and cultural history has received little scholarly attention. A primary goal of her dissertation is to demonstrate the centrality of women in Montreal’s jazz scene. She also attends to the role that discourses around jazz played in articulations of Quebec nationalism and modernity as they interacted with women’s racialized and ethnicized bodies. Vanessa presented some of her work at the meetings of the American Musicological Society (2013), the Society for American Music (2015), the Conférence Internationale des Recherches Féministes dans la Francophonie (2015), and at the 2015 Feminist Theory and Music conference. She was invited to contribute a chapter in the edited collection Eroticism in Early Modern Music (eds. Laurie Stras and Bonnie Blackburn, Ashgate: 2015) and in 2014 she was awarded the prestigious SOCAN Award for Writings in Canadian Music for her work on musical collaborations between Inuit throat singers and avant-garde string ensembles. Vanessa was the recipient of a 2012 Doctoral Joseph-Armand Bombardier Fellowship from SSHRC.

Nicholas Barber

PhD Candidate,
Anthropology
Malloch Fellow 2015-16

Nicholas Barber

PhD Candidate,
Anthropology
Malloch Fellow 2015-16

Nicholas Barber conducts collaborative research with a participatory video project in Baka indigenous communities in southeast Cameroon. His research examines how enterprising Baka are engaging in strategic self-representation in order to achieve specific socio-political objectives, including establishing claims to land and other resources, increasing political visibility domestically and abroad, and influencing social and economic development projects. Employing a multi-sited methodology that travels between local and “global” sites of media production and circulation, the project examines both the impact of mediamaking on local Baka identities and lifeworlds, and seeks to provide an account of the global indigenous “mediascape” through the lens of Baka mediamaking.

Nicholas Barber
Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology

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Sunita Nigam

PhD Candidate,
English
Malloch Fellow 2015-16

Sunita Nigam

PhD Candidate,
English
Malloch Fellow 2015-16

I write about urban performance and nightlife cultures in North America. Focusing on New York City, Montreal, and Mexico City, my dissertation, titled “The Exhibitionists: Performing the City from Mexico ’68 to the Burlesque Revival” traces a history of changing relationships between performance, the urban, the national, and the global from the Mexico ’68 Olympics, through disco culture in New York in the 1970s and 1980s, to the burlesque revival in Montreal from the 1990s to the present. I show how each of these performance cultures articulates different relationships to its city and to the idea of city-ness itself as it participates in a global and circulatory economy of place.

https://mcgill.academia.edu/SunitaNigam

Yildiz Ipek Mehmetoglu

PhD Student, Faculty of Engineering, School of Architecture
Fred and Betty Price 2015-16

Yildiz Ipek Mehmetoglu

PhD Student, Faculty of Engineering, School of Architecture
Fred and Betty Price 2015-16

Yildiz Ipek Mehmetoglu is a PhD student at McGill University School of Architecture, under the supervision of Professor Annmarie Adams, since September 2014. She received her Master of Arts degree in History of Architecture program in 2014, and her B.Arch degree in Architecture in 2012, both from Middle East Technical University (METU) in Ankara, Turkey. In 2010-2011 she spent one year in École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Belleville as an exchange student. Between 2012 and 2014, she worked as teaching and research assistant at METU Department of Architecture. Her research investigates the relationship between early twentieth century art, architecture and everyday life and space through the lenses of gender studies. She is particularly interested in the issues of travel, domesticity and nature in the formation of identity and relations held towards the public and outdoors life and space by early twentieth century North American and European women artists and writers.

Erin Sobat

BA (History) 2016
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2015-16

Erin Sobat

BA (History) 2016
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2015-16

Erin Sobat
BA (History) 2016
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2015–16
Through the Archie Malloch Internship Award, I am working as a Curatorial Assistant in the Asian Art collection at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montreal. My project is focused on investigating the history of Japanese art collecting in Montreal and evaluating the contemporary gallery collection in light of its largely Anglo-Protestant, orientalist origins. In particular, I am focusing on the translation (and dislocation) of artistic connoisseurship from East to West, turn-of-the-century collecting aesthetics in North America, and the role of the early development and institutionalization of the Japanese collection in shaping our understanding of “Japan” today. Through this work, I will also have the opportunity to explore the museum’s ties with McGill University and various publics throughout Montreal’s history, and to formulate new suggestions for the display and programming of the collection.
Email: erin.sobat@mail.mcgill.ca
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/erinsobat

Sajdeep Soomal

BA (History) 2016
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2015-16

Sajdeep Soomal

BA (History) 2016
Malloch Undergrad Intern 2015-16

Saj is a graphic design activist who works to bring academic scholarship to public spheres. He writes about the history of medicine and the south asian diaspora. He is excited to work on educational programming and community outreach at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Follow @sajdeep.

Sophie Reuss

BA (African Studies, Philosophy, and Cell Biology) 2015
IPLAI Fellow in Public Practice

Sophie Reuss

BA (African Studies, Philosophy, and Cell Biology) 2015
IPLAI Fellow in Public Practice

Sophia Reuss is interested in the relationship between the humanities and natural sciences. Particularly in how phenomenological inquiry can, and should, inform policy and practices in health care systems and medical sciences. She is currently writing about ‘allied research’, which involves exploring the intersections between moral philosophy, social justice activism, and biomedical research. Sophia is also currently the Editor/Coordinator for the Alternatives International Journal.

Eliza Bateman

Doctoral Candidate, Faculty of Law
Future Humanities TRaCE Liaison Officer

Eliza Bateman

Doctoral Candidate, Faculty of Law
Future Humanities TRaCE Liaison Officer

Eliza is the Liaison Officer on the TRaCE project. In this role, she coordinates with graduate students at contributing universities to create connections between current students and PhD alumni about educational and post-educational experiences related to an humanities PhD.

Eliza is also a PhD Candidate in the McGill Faculty of Law. Her research focuses on experiences of LGBT members of conservative religious communities, in terms of challenges between competing legal orders that seek to identify and protect/threaten sexual identity. Before coming back to grad school, Eliza worked in Australia as a human rights lawyer and legal policy adviser.

Casey J. McCormick

PhD Candidate, Media and Cultural Studies
Future Humanities Social Media Officer

Casey J. McCormick

PhD Candidate, Media and Cultural Studies
Future Humanities Social Media Officer

Casey is a PhD Candidate in Media and Cultural Studies at McGill University, completing a dissertation entitled “TV Finales and the Sociality of Endings.” Her work traces histories of convergence culture, participatory media, and audience practices. She is a contributor to Time in Television Narrative (University of Mississippi Press, 2012), The Netflix Effect (Bloomsbury, 2015), Participations: International Journal of Audience Research (2016), and A Companion to Fandom and Fan Studies (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017). Casey teaches Cultural Studies courses at McGill, coordinates social media for IPLAI, and co-organizes IPLAI’s Future Humanities initiative.

Catherine Nygren

PhD Candidate, English Literature and Digital Humanities
Future Humanities TRaCE Writer

Catherine Nygren

PhD Candidate, English Literature and Digital Humanities
Future Humanities TRaCE Writer

Catherine Nygren is a Ph.D. candidate in English at McGill University. Her past projects have involved digital texts and mapping on the Grub Street Project and textual analytics for Distant Reading Early Modernity. Her dissertation explores the style of eighteenth-century British travel literature using various text-mining methods.

Nichole Austin

PhD Candidate, Epidemiology
Future Humanities TRaCE Quant

Nichole Austin

PhD Candidate, Epidemiology
Future Humanities TRaCE Quant

Nichole is a PhD candidate in Epidemiology at McGill University. She is interested in how reproductive health policies – particularly those restricting access to abortion and contraception – affect access to essential health care services and women’s health outcomes in developed countries. In her TRaCE role, Nichole is responsible for analyzing and presenting data on PhD graduates.

Anna Lewton-Brain

PhD Candidate, English
Early Modern Conversions Graduate Student Associate and Webmaster

Anna Lewton-Brain

PhD Candidate, English
Early Modern Conversions Graduate Student Associate and Webmaster

Anna Lewton-Brain, BA (Vind), MA (Dal) is completing a PhD in English Literature at McGill University, where she has taught courses on poetics and Shakespeare. Her dissertation, entitled “Metaphysical Music: Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, and Seventeenth-Century Song” examines the intersections of music and the Metaphysical poets in Renaissance English literary culture. Anna has maintained a singing career in tandem with her academic pursuits, performing with the King’s College Chapel Choir, Symphony Nova Scotia Chorus, McGill Chamber Orchestra, Music at the Red Roof Bach Cantata Series, and in the Montreal Bach Festival. Her literary and musical vocations intersect frequently: she presented a public talk on music and poetry at the Montreal Baroque Festival in 2014, performed in a workshop on Renaissance polyphony at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in June 2015, and lead and sang in a workshop on seventeenth-century poetry and music at the University of Cambridge in July 2015. Her research is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) fellowship and the Early Modern Conversions project.

The Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas offers a range of internship and fellowship opportunities for McGill undergraduate and graduate students. Apply for awards here.

Past Award Winners

Archie Malloch Undergraduate Interns in Public Learning

Leïla Rached-d’Astous (Summer 2014), BSc, Architecture, 2015
Sadie Menicanin (Summer 2014), BMus, Music History, 2015
Anna Foran (Summer 2013), BA, Art History, 2014
Christy Frost (Summer 2013), BA,English, 2014
Sheehan Moore (Summer 2012), BA Hons, Anthropology, 2013
Jasmine Wilson (Summer 2012), BMus, Performance Voice, 2013
Bora Plumptre (Summer 2011), BA hons, History and Philosophy, 2012
Rachel Thorne (Summer 2011), BA 2011
Thea Fitz-James (Summer 2010), BA Hons, English, 2011

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Archie Malloch Graduate Fellows in Public Learning

Caroline Bem (2014-15 Fellow), PhD candidate, Communication Studies.
Nina Penner (2014-15 Fellow), PhD candidate in Musicology, Schulich School of Music
Meghan Goodchild (2013-14 Fellow), PhD candidate, Schulich School of Music
Vincent Post (2013-14 Fellow), PhD candidate, Department of Political Science
Danijela Zutic (2012-13 Fellow, Department of Art History and Communication Studies
Tomasz Grusiecki (2011-12 Fellow), PhD candidate, Department of Art History and Communciation Studies
Hans Bernhard (2010-11 Fellow), MMus candidate, Schulich School of Music

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Fred and Betty Price Research Award Recipients

Tanya Southcott (2014), PhD candidate, Faculty of Engineering, School of Architecture
Julia Morgan Charles (2013), PhD candidate, Department of Art History and Communication Studies
Cheryl Thompson (2012), PhD candidate, Department of Art History and Communication Studies
Katherine Scott (2012), PhD candidate, Department of Anthropology
Marie-Pierre Gadoua (2010), PhD candidate, Department of Anthropology

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Max Stern McCord Museum Fellows*

Reilley Bishop-Stall (2014-15 Fellow), PhD candidate, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.
Michael “Max” Hamon (2013-14 Fellow), PhD candidate, Department of History
Rafico Ruiz (2012-13 Fellow), PhD candidate,Department of Art History & Communication Studies.
Cheryl Thompson (2012 -13 Fellow), PhD candidate, Department of Art History & Communication Studies, Faculty of Arts

*please note that IPLAI no longer houses the Max Stern McCord Museum Award. For more information contact the Faculty of Arts.